Techniques

Short Rows: Japanese Short Rows

This will be the last in this series for the time being. This week, I look at Japanese short rows.

This method looks really nice in stockinette stitch. In part because of the slipped stitch, and in part because of the minimal yarn used in the “wrap”. Marking the thread but not wrapping keeps that loop really small.
It’s fiddly to work, though- and you’ll need removeable stitch markers or bobby pins (or scrap yarn) to mark the working yarn at the turning locations.

I hope these short row videos have been helpful!

Until next time, Happy Knitting!

Techniques

Short Rows: German Short Rows

This week we’ll look at German short rows. I really like this technique, because it’s easy to perform, easy to see where your short rows are, and easy to resolve the short rows. It isn’t always the best choice for a particular fabric, but when I’m not extremely concerned about the look of the fabric (at sock heels, for example) they tend to be my go-to short row method.

Here’s a video showing how they are worked:

I hope this was helpful! Next week we’ll look at shadow short rows.

Until next time, Happy Knitting!

Techniques

Short Rows: Wrap and Turn in Garter

I’m starting a series of videos on short row methods. The first video focuses on wrap and turn short rows – without picking up the wraps. This is my favorite method to use for garter stitch, since I think it looks the absolute best of all the techniques in that fabric.

You can use this method in other fabrics as well. It will leave a noticeable purl bar, so keep that in mind. It may look fine in some lace fabrics, or if you want to draw attention to the short rows.

Next week I’ll cover wrap and turn short rows where the wraps get picked up and hidden.

Until next time, Happy Knitting!